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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products found in the catalog.

Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products

Pascaline Dupas

Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products

evidence from a field experiment

by Pascaline Dupas

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  • 24 Currently reading

Published by National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, MA .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementPascaline Dupas
SeriesNBER working paper series -- working paper 16298, Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research : Online) -- working paper no. 16298.
ContributionsNational Bureau of Economic Research
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB1
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24485123M
LC Control Number2010656249

Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment NBER Working Paper No. w Number of pages: 47 Posted: 24 Aug Last Revised: 15 Jun   Free provision of preventive health products can dramatically increase access in low income countries. > C/V, so that the ratio of new users to new recipients must be greater than the ratio of the subsidy per taker to the policymaker’s Dupas P. Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: Evidence from a field.

short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: evidence from a field experiment econometrica dupas, p. ; 82 (1): View details for DOI /ECTA View details for Web of Science ID Short‐Run Subsidies and Long‐Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence From a Field Experiment Econometrica, , 82, (1), View citations (84) See also Working Paper () Savings Constraints and Microenterprise Development: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya.

  P. Dupas “Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: Evidence from a field experiment” (NBER Working Paper No. , ). T. Bond, . If you choose a topic on Globalization, for example, you need to do research on this topic and write a report which will analyse how Globalization is affecting the countries and/or companies in their pursuit of market expansion or market share or .


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Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products by Pascaline Dupas Download PDF EPUB FB2

Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption. We present a model of technology adoption in which people learn about a technology's effectiveness by using it (or observing others using it) for some time, but people quit using it too early if they face higher-than-expected usage costs Cited by: Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment Pascaline Dupasy UCLA 15 October Draft Abstract Distribution of free or highly subsidized health products is common in poor coun-tries, often –nanced by foreign aid.

But large subsidies in the short run might be detrimental for product adoption in the long run. Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption.

A common fear among development practitioners is that one-off subsidies may negatively affect long-run adoption through reference-dependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the product by: Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence From a Field Experiment Article in Econometrica 82(id) January Author: Pascaline Dupas.

Abstract. Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption. We present a model of technology adoption in which people learn about a technology's effectiveness by using it (or observing others using it) for some time, but people quit using it too early if they face higher-than-expected usage costs Cited by: Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment Pascaline Dupasy UCLA, NBER and CEPR Aug Abstract Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries.

How do they a⁄ect long-run adoption. We present a model of technology adoption in which people. "Short‐Run Subsidies and Long‐Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence From a Field Experiment," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol.

82(1), pagesJanuary. Pascaline Dupas, " Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment," NBER Working PapersNational. Short-run, targeted subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they a¤ect long-run adoption.

Standard economic theory predicts that they may increase long-run adoption through experience and social learning e¤ects. Those e¤ects will be muted, however, if subsidized products are unused or misused. title: short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: evidence from a field experiment created date: z.

Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption. A common fear among development practitioners is that one-off subsidies may negatively affect long-run adoption through referencedependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the product later.

Short‐run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long‐run adoption. A common fear among development practitioners is that one‐off subsidies may negatively affect long‐run adoption through reference‐dependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the product later.

Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment Pascaline Dupasy UCLA, NBER and CEPR March 4, Abstract Short-run, targeted subsidies for health products are common in poor countries.

How do they a⁄ect long-run adoption. Standard economic theory predicts that they may increase long-run adoption.

Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption. We present a model of technology adoption in which people learn about a technology's effectiveness by using it (or observing others using it) for some time, but people quit using it too early if they face higher-than-expected usage costs (e.g., side effects).

Short-run, targeted subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption. Standard economic theory predicts that they may increase long-run adoption through experience and social learning effects. Those effects will be muted, however, if subsidized products are unused or misused.

Subsidies have also been argued to generate. SUBSIDIES AND NEW HEALTH PRODUCTS The view that these negative effects might dominate the standard positive learning and health effects is quite prevalent among development practition ers.

There is, however, no rigorous evidence to date as to what short-run sub sidies do to long-run adoption of new technologies. Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption. A common fear among development practitioners is that one-off subsidies may negatively affect long-run adoption through reference-dependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the product later.

Global Health Systems: Pricing and User Fees Encyclopedia of Health Economics vol. 2, Anthony J. Culyer, Ed. (Elsevier, San Diego, ).

Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment Econometrica 82(1), pp.January  , Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: Evidence from a field experiment. Econometr – (). doi: /ECTA OpenUrl CrossRef PubMed Web of Science.

Pascaline DupasShort-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: evidence from a field experiment Econometrica, 82. Short-run subsidies and long-run adoption of new health products: evidence from a field experiment. Autores: Pascaline Dupas Localización: Econométrica: Journal of the Econometric Society, ISSNVol.

82, Nº 1,págs. Idioma: inglés Resumen. Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. Short‐run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long‐run adoption? A common fear among development practitioners is that one‐off subsidies may negatively affect long‐run adoption through reference‐dependence: People might anchor around the subsidized price and be unwilling to pay more for the.Short-Run Subsidies and Long-Run Adoption of New Health Products: Evidence from a Field Experiment.

J-PAL Policy Bulletin: The Price is Wrong. PM’s Article on Universal Healthcare. WHO Releases New Guidance on Insecticide-Treated Mosquito Nets. School Subsidies for the Poor: Evaluating the Mexican Progresa Poverty Program.Abstract.

Short-run subsidies for health products are common in poor countries. How do they affect long-run adoption? We present a model of technology adoption in which people learn about a technology's effectiveness by using it (or observing others using it) for some time, but people quit using it too early if they face higher-than-expected usage costs (e.g., side effects).